Side Swiper

Ryan Hughbanks, Maple, Walnut, Purpleheart, Padauk, Cherry, Oak, Alder, & Poplar (!), 10.5″ x 7.5″ x 6.5″

The ketchup lessons of yore are true: good things come to those who wait…

Ryan Hughbanks popped up on Facebook (the puzzling pages at least) a little over a year ago; thanks to some puzzle friends (Merci!), I was able to start my process of polite harassment and cyber-stalking early. This gave me the opportunity to get to know Ryan a bit over the last year, and to recently be offered the 7th copy of his sd puzzle box, Side Swiper. Obviously I jumped at the chance (this post would be rather pointless had I not) and soon a !large box arrived with a slightly less large (and decidedly more interesting) box inside: Smooth and buttery like a Kagen Sound box, with the colorful playfulness of a Kel Snache, and the generous puzzle proportions of a Juno, Ryan has created an excellent puzzle with numerous nooks and crannies to be discovered, using clues, sequential discovery, exploration, and general puzzle-boxery.

Almost a foot (27 cm) long, SS stands out in any collection (it’s pretty enough that it would anyway). The reason for its name is pretty clear: three bars are situated on either side of the box, set into channels running most of the box’s widths with a few vertical lines of various woods spaced along its length. The box has four drawers and a hinged door visible as well. Atop the box are two striped pieces of wood, which we are warned are NOT handles, as well as three more wooden lines set into its surface.

The box features a number of decorative touches that really make it stand out, using a grand total of eight (!) different woods. Thin strips of wood are perfectly integrated into its surface in many places an the edges and corners are covered in a Walnut frame (with protruding semi-spheres) that contrasts wonderfully with the maple that is the box’s base color. The bottom is made with as much care, despite being featureless: we are told that it is not “active” (which makes sense considering the box’s dimensions and weight).

The instructions confirm what casual inspection may lead you to suspect (and the instructions more or less confirm): at least some of the solve will rely on discovering some kind of clues to do some kind of something. He instructs us not to pick any locks (not if you want to do it the right way!) and assures us that “There is an answer for everything.” This admonition of impending fun is also comforting for those of us lost in a perpetual state of existential dread.

The clue-based mechanisms featured in the solution seem straightforward enough in some respects that they may mislead you in others. While some amount of escape-room-in-a-box puzzling plays a significant role in the box, it is really just one comparatively small (yet significant) aspect of the solution as a whole; it is a great balance, as the sequential discovery / take-apart aspects of the puzzle form the majority of the mechanisms that must be discovered and understood.

This is the kind of puzzle that keeps on puzzling: even after you think, “once I figure out how to do this, it must be the end,” nope, there’s probably another step or three to be solved before you will find the signed piece that lets you know you’ve reached the end. (As a semi-digression, I have come to increasingly appreciate such a touch – it’s happened more than few times that I’ve looked at a puzzle wondering if I’d finished it or had put it away thinking it was done, only to learn that there was a bit more puzzling to be done (a further digression: in some rare cases this is actually pretty awesome – there is one specific puzzle (one which I reviewed previously) to have come out in the last year that infamously “finishes” with several more “hidden” steps that continue past the official solution provided (in this case, I’d found something that I knew had to do something and asked my npso to check the solution: nothing in there about it, but an amused and somewhat cryptic response from the designer confirmed my suspicions – it is worth noting that I still haven’t figured this part out lol!)).

Side Swiper is definitely tricky, hiding multiple ahas in its sizable frame, although I wouldn’t necessarily say that it is crazy hard – it is not necessarily the kind of puzzle that will spend months sullenly sitting in some semi-solved state, staring at my sad-a$$ self and is instead the type that you will want to run back through the solution just for the fun of it (like a good Juno sd).

SS is just plain fun and extremely satisfying. The preponderance of compartments positively predicts puzzlers’ impending pleasure at progressing through its plentiful parts. Asinine alliteration aside, the sense of discovery is strong with this one as you are rewarded with access to spaces that are clear from casual inspection, as well as suspected and secret ones.

And, as has been said and deserves being said again, it’s just so darn purty that I’d be surprised if many puzzlers actually turned one down, should they have the opportunity to get one. When his initial fb posts were discovered and shortly thereafter shared on discord, he was inundated with messages and requests; I think he was surprised but I most certainly was not because (one more time!) it looks awesome!

Ryan has been busy this past year; his obvious talent as a woodworker and the compelling nature of the box has led him to meet and get to know some of the best puzzle box makers out there. He already had a couple designs (copies of which were also shown in that early post) and has since been working on a couple more – and lo, the cyber-stalking of puzzles past would continue on, its vigor renewed and spirit unbroken.

. . . and the puzzler was happy.

Check out Ryan’s website at: https://hughbankspuzzleboxes.weebly.com/


Collector Grade: Five Sinatras

(click here for more information on the Sinatra Scaling System, (c) John Maynard Keynes, 1944)


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